Thursday, March 31, 2011

Do the Vulnerable, the Sick, the Weak Have a "Duty To Die"?


This article is from MercatorNet:



Should "unproductive burdens" on society do the right thing by the rest of us and make an early exit?




There was a moment during Australia's last national debate on euthanasia that deserves to be revisited by a new generation of legislators, a moment that crystallised fears that the so-called right to die would come to be felt by the 
frailest among us more as a "duty to die".


It was 1995 and our then governor-general, Bill Hayden, was addressing the College of Physicians during debate on the Northern Territory's euthanasia laws. The scene was significant, since the dual concern with euthanasia is the corruption of the relationship between the state and its most vulnerable citizens, and between doctors and their most vulnerable patients. Our head of state urged doctors to support euthanasia not only as a right, but also as a positive duty towards society. He reflected on past cultures where the elderly would take their lives when their usefulness had passed, and declared of our own culture: "There is a point when the succeeding generations deserve to be disencumbered of some unproductive burdens." The next day a retired state governor, Mark Oliphant, publicly supported Hayden's astonishing message to "unproductive burdens" that they should do the right thing by society. This is the callousing of social attitudes, the insidious pressure on the frail and demoralised, that we could expect within a culture of mercy-killing.

A year earlier in Britain, a House of Lords select committee on medical ethics completed the most thorough enquiry into euthanasia ever undertaken, and concluded in stark contrast to Hayden: "The message which society sends to vulnerable and disadvantaged people should not, however obliquely, encourage them to seek death, but should assure them of our care and support in life." This committee began with a majority in favour of euthanasia, but ended by rejecting it as unsafe and corrupting public policy: "It would be next to impossible to ensure that every act of euthanasia was truly voluntary. We are concerned that vulnerable people - the elderly, lonely, sick or distressed - would feel pressure, whether real or imagined, to seek early death."

1 comment:

O Senhor te dê a paz ! said...

Obrigada irmã por visitar meu blog.
O perdão a qual Jesus nos pede é algo que temos que exercitar todos os dias de nossas vidas, pois caso contrário, ficamos reféns de grandes rancores interiores. Aprendamos com Jesus perdoar! amém.